Klezmanouche

Klezmanouche offers a meeting between « klezmer » music (Jewish music from the Yiddishland) and Gypsy jazz. These musical traditions share the same fervor in its musical interpretation, as well as in ornamentation and improvisation.

From fidelity to boldness, Klezmanouche offers subtle compositions and revisits Gypsy tunes by mixing it with Yiddish singing. An original repertoire that highlights the playing and light voice of the singer Astrid Ruff, and the performance of the virtuoso musicians (Yves Weyh - accordion, Engé Helmstetter - guitar, Tchatcho Helmstetter - violin, Vincent Posty - double bass) who never seem to lose inspiration…
And as a bonus : a song arranged in a pure Gypsy jazz style, sung in ... Alsatian !

A CD you can purchase for 7 € on the website of the Lufteater

Gekumen fun Poylen
Eynsam
Hand in Hand
PDF - 570.3 kb
Présentation du CD Klezmanouche

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  • Gekumen fun Poylen

  • Eynsam

  • Hand in Hand

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