Sarah Gorby - Dana, Dana

Sarah Gorby was born around the turn of the century in Kishinev, which then belonged to Tsarist Russia. She was the descendant of a mainly Russian-speaking family of ordinary shopkeepers from Poland.

At the age of 17, she left home to study music in Jassy (Rumania), and got married. After spending some time in Rome, she settled in Paris during the 1920s. In 1940, she emigrated with her husband to Haiti, before returning to Paris in 1949, the year in which she recorded most of her titles on the Elesdisc label ‒ only two being cut during the summer of 1950. She spent several months a year abroad (in South America, South Africa and Israel), although while Paris remained her center of gravity until her death in 1980.

Ellen F. Prince, in an article published in 1987, described Sarah Gorby’s talent and love for languages and dialects. Her dominant language was Russian, then Yiddish. She was also proficient in French, Rumanian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German and spoke English fluently, although with a strong Russian accent.

You may also like

French Music Before And After The Great War

LATEST PUBLICATION OF THE EIJM. This CD presents the Symphonie in C minor by Fernand Halphen (World premiere) and the Piano Concerto for the Left (…)

The Hourglass - A musical voyage through the Jewish soul

LATEST PUBLICATION OF THE EIJM. This CD presents works for cello and piano written in the first half of the 20th century by Ernest Bloch, Lazare (…)

Gala concert of the European Institute for Jewish Music – 3rd edition

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 12th 2017, 5h30pm, Salle Cortot - Paris, the EIJM invites you to its Great Gala Concert. BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW on our online (…)

Sarah Gorby - In der Finster

Sarah Gorby was born around the turn of the century in Kishinev, which then belonged to Tsarist Russia. She was the descendant of a mainly (…)

Berele Chagy - Wehu Rachum

Berele Chagy is born in 1892 in Latvia and was a great tenor. He emigrated in 1921 in the United States, where he died of a heart attack in (…)